Travel What is there to see and do in Turin, Italy

With direct flights from the UK, taking around two hours, Turin is a convenient destination for a long weekend. Originally laid out by the Romans, the streets still follow the same grid pattern, and the center is compact enough to explore on foot. This was a Royal city, first the capital of the Kingdom of Savoy and then, briefly Italy’s first capital, before becoming an industrial powerhouse in the 20th century. These days the factories...
June 19, 2021

With direct flights from the UK, taking around two hours, Turin is a convenient destination for a long weekend. Originally laid out by the Romans, the streets still follow the same grid pattern, and the center is compact enough to explore on foot.

This was a Royal city, first the capital of the Kingdom of Savoy and then, briefly Italy’s first capital, before becoming an industrial powerhouse in the 20th century. These days the factories are silent and the pedestrianized center is full of museums, galleries.

Grand Cafes

Showing the influence of the Hapsburg, the city is endowed with ornate similar to those in Vienna. Their interiors are a riot of gilded upholstery, chandeliers, wooden panels, and long mirrors. Ava Gardener and James Stewart were regulars at the Torino and Baratti & Milano is famous for its thick hot chocolate.

Markets

If you really want to get an idea of the quality of the region’s produce, then you won’t be disappointed at the Porta Palazzo Market, located in Piazza Della Repubblica. With over 800 stalls, it’s one of the largest open-air markets in Europe and is open Monday to Saturday. There are also three market halls dedicated to fish, meat, cheese, and bread and a farmers’ market with around 100 stalls selling fresh produce.

Cinema Museum

The pagoda-like spire of the Mole Antonelliana stands out on the Turin skyline and it was originally built as a synagogue in the 19th century. These days it houses the Museo Nazionale del Cinema with over 7,000 films in the library, a collection of 150,000 posters, and various bits of cinema, including Marilyn Monroe’s bodice. Five floors document the story of the movies and themed exhibitions, all with film sets, photographs, designs, and sketches. Take the glass lift up 87m to the top of the spire for great views of the city, the river, and the Alps.